Their World Was Better

When the last of my parents’ generation is gone, there will be a huge void in the world.  The last known Americans raised by parents that endured The Great Depression and World War II.  People who put manners before self-gratification.  People who taught their children that respect and character are worthwhile and noble values.

Their word was their anchor to a life dedicated to honesty and commitment to whatever their choices and fate set before them.

Dad out on the town with St. Louis University buddies, 1950
Dad out on the town with St. Louis University buddies, 1950

My parents and grandparents were not perfect.  Just genuine.  And a lot less needy and dissatisfied than the generations that followed.  They were better at accepting what is than the rest of us.

I know these reflections make me sound like a sentimental old person.  I just hope that, somehow, there is a glimmer of the beauty and truth of my parents and their generation’s approach to life that passes through me to my children….so that Dick (my Dad) and Rhetta (my Mom)  will never be gone forever.

Mom serving tea with her best friend at Maryville College, St. Louis, MO.  1950
Mom serving tea with her best friend at Maryville College, St. Louis, MO. 1950

3 thoughts on “Their World Was Better

  1. Great post and very true, Manners were very important during that time frame, you see it less often today, hardly anyone takes off their hats when entering someone’s home when this was done out of respect The list of manners is fading to the book of history of what once was..

    Like

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